Capacity of Adolescents to Consent to Sexual and Reproductive Health Services: The Case for Policy, Legal and Pragmatic Reform

Capacity of Adolescents to Consent to Sexual and Reproductive Health Services: The Case for Policy, Legal and Pragmatic Reform

Filename Capacity-of-Adolescents-to-Consent-to-SRHR-Services.pdf
Filesize 206 KB
Version 1
Date added September 18, 2019
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Category General, Policy Briefs, Training Tools
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Uganda’s laws prescribe 18 years as the age of adulthood, at this age an individual is deemed to have the capacity to make their own decisions. The capacity of minors to consent is an area of contention with conflicting laws, policies and practices. While it is reasonable that parents should contribute in the making of major decisions for their under-age children, many adolescents have evolving capacities depending on their circumstances and environment which makes them mature and or emancipated before the age of 18 and requiring them to provide parental consent would instead hinder access to critical health care services.